The Book of Phoenix by Nnedi Okorafor

(recommended by Allison)

A 6-star novel, if there is such a thing. Here is yet another of Okorafor’s sympathetic, multi-layered heroines taking charge of a hypnotic story.

While “The Book of Phoenix” is certainly a pulse-pounding sci-fi novel, it also tackles such topics as colonialism and non-consensual medical experimentation, and is laced with acute moments of both human innocence and cruelty.

Okorafor continues to be a fearless, original, captivating, and heartfelt writer.  This is an X-Men for a new age.

Disclaimer by Renee Knight

(recommended by Kelsey)

Disclaimer is a page-turning thriller at the top of the pile with books like Gone Girl and The Girl on the Train. Like the others in that category, it demands to be read in one sitting. But at the heart of this novel lies a crucial conversation, one that is both difficult to have and yet incredibly necessary. Renee Knight has created a book that is a pleasure to read and still makes you think in a way only the best books can. Highly recommended!

A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas

(recommended by Teresa)

Sarah J. Maas has done it again!!! I fell in love with the world that she created with this novel, and I am really looking forward to hearing more of Feyre and Tamlin’s story. Feyre is such a strong, independent female character, and it is so refreshing to she how she goes about her life without any help. After being “sold” to the fairies, she is suddenly immersed in Tamlin’s world, and world that is unlike anything she has ever experienced. The world of the Fey was so well described that I felt like I had been there, and I cannot even begin to talk about the relationship between Feyre and Tamlin, I even adored the relationship between Feyre and Lucien and Rhysland is such an intriguing character!!! Cannot wait to read the next in the trilogy!!

Where They Found Her by Kimberly McCreight

(recommended by Teresa)

Being a new mother, the subject matter of this novel was pretty dark and chilling, but McCreight has woven a haunting story of expectations and loss. When a university town is rocked by infanticide everyone becomes a suspect. A newbie reporter is assigned this story, and a past traumatic experience makes this story hit a little too close to home. With the town all under a microscope past wounds are re-opened and long buried secrets are told, riveting story that kept me guessing til the end.

Uprooted by Naomi Novik

(recommended by Allison)

In quite a departure from her Temeraire series, Novik gives us a story rooted (see what I did there) in Polish and other eastern European folklore. While it strongly draws on many recognizable fairy tale themes and tropes, it also turns many of these on their head in a delightful manner. The end result is a tale of romance and adventure, along with a generous dollop of horror (if you don’t think possession is terrifying, move along). Agnieszka is a fantastic heroine to follow, a likeable fusion of delightfully (but not annoyingly) average, startlingly clever, and magically gifted. WONDERFUL.

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