Banned Book Week starts on Sunday. A week to raise awareness on the fact that freedom of speech is often challenged and that by allowing freedom of expression and press, we all succeed.

Many people don’t realize that children’s books are often as challenged as many teen and adult titles.

Buzzfeed and Powell’s have full lists. A few of our favorite titles are…

Where’s Waldo? by Martin Handford

When: 1987
Why: The book was banned and then reprinted because it originally showcased a topless beach-goer (not like anyone could find her if they tried, though).

Where's Waldo? by Martin Handford

The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein

When: 1988
Why: Everyone’s favorite childhood book was banned from a public library in Colorado because it was considered “sexist.” It was also challenged by several schools because it “criminalized the foresting agency.”

The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein

Winnie-the-Pooh by A. A. Milne

When: 2006
Why: Talking animals are somehow considered an “insult to god,” resulting in this book’s banning throughout random parts of the United States. Several institutions in Turkey and the UK have also banned the book, claiming that the character of Piglet is offensive to Muslims. Other institutions claim that the book revolves around Nazism.

Winnie-the-Pooh by A. A. Milne

Charlotte’s Web by E. B. White

When: 2006
Why: Similar to Winnie-the-Pooh, this book was banned in Kansas because talking animals are considered an “insult to god.”

Charlotte's Web by E. B. White

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

When: 1900
Why: Apparently there are references to sexual fantasies and masturbation in this book, resulting in its ban from classrooms in New Hampshire. Since this original banning, the book has been challenged by thousands of other institutions, most famously in the 1960s in fear that it would promote drug use to children.

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Happy Reading!
~Rebecca Lee Robinson
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